Ernest Hemingway Survived Two Planes Crashes In Africa


Few people can boast having survived a plane
crash. What about surviving 2 plane crashes, one
after the other? You think it’s impossible? Well, this guy did. And you know the name of the lucky man who
survived 2 plane crashes in succession. It’s Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway’s biography is far richer than
that of the characters from his books. He was a skilled boxer, a passionate hunter
and fisherman, and a journalist. He had more energy than a dozen men put together. No wonder he’d been crazy about Africa for
many years. The scale, the atmosphere, the danger – it
all suited him perfectly in the vast territories of that wild continent. In 1933 Hemingway finished his book ‘Winner
take nothing’ and spent all the profits on putting his lifelong dream into practice:
he went to Lake Tanganyika, where he made a camp, hired servants and guides from the
local tribe, and started going hunting. In January 1934, Hemingway came back from
yet another safari and got sick with intestinal amoebic dysentery. Each day he was getting worse; he was delirious
and severely dehydrated. They sent a plane for him, which took the
ill writer to an English hospital in Dar Es Salaam – the capital of the territory. He spent a week there, had a course of therapy
and started to recover. For most travellers that would’ve been enough
to fall out of love with Africa forever. But not Hemingway. He finished his hunting season quite successfully,
and later described his African experience in 2 books. He devoted “Miss Mary’s Lion” to his
wife and her long lion hunt. “Green Hills of Africa” is an autobiographic
book, a travelogue in fact. He wrote later that he never knew of a morning
in Africa that he didn’t wake up happy. It’s no wonder that his passion for adventures
drew him back there again. On January 21, 1954 Hemingway made a Christmas
present for his dear wife Mary Welsh. Together with pilot Roy Marsh, they set out
from Nairobi to visit the Belgian Congo in a small plane. They flew above the Kenyan highlands, the
Serengeti valley inhabited by hundreds of animals, and a huge volcano with a 12 miles’
wide crater. By evening they arrived at the Belgian Congo. After a night in a hotel in Uganda, they were
up in the air again, above lakes George and Albert in the Western rift valley and the
400-foot Murchison Falls. The Nile here descends gradually, rather than
abruptly plunging down like Niagara. This is one of the most difficult to reach
and spectacular places in Uganda—inhabited by hundreds of crocodiles, elephants, lions
and other big animals. They came down to a lower height and had a
chance to see the powerful foamy flow. As Marsh circled over the falls for the 3d
time, he saw a flight of ibis in front of the plane and dove sharply under them. The plane’s propeller and tail got hooked
on an old telegraph wire. The pilot had to crash-land in the heavy bush
close to the White Nile bustling with crocodiles. But that was only the beginning. Mary had 2 broken ribs and Hemingway himself
had a shoulder sprain; only the pilot remained unhurt. They had to spend that ill-fated night in
the brushwood at Murchison Falls. They made a fire to scare off elephants and
predators while Roy Marsh was sending up an SOS, repeating the plane’s callsign: “Victor
Love Item! Victor Love Item!” The team of the British Overseas Airways Corporation,
which was flying above the crash site, didn’t hear the signal. The pilot said that he’d seen traces of a
plane crash and decided that the passengers could’ve survived and gone in search of
a shelter. There were 2 planes searching around the territory,
but they failed to find the survivors. The next day, Hemingway and Roy Marsh were
able to flag down a passing riverboat, “Murchison”, which took them to Butiaba on the western
shore of Lake Albert. During their journey on the steamer, Hemingway
found out that it’d been shot in the movie “The African Queen”, starring Katharine
Hepburn, who he really admired. By the time they got to Butiaba, thanks to
an international telegraph, rumor had it that one of the greatest living writers was in
a plane crash in the middle of Africa. It was the year before Hemingway got a Pulitzer
prize for “The Old Man and the Sea”, and his popularity was enormous. The media suspected that he hadn’t survived. There were 2 men waiting for them on arrival
– a policeman, Williams, and a pilot, Reginald Cartwright. Reginald was lucky to have traced Hemingway’s
route up to Butiaba. He had a small plane that was waiting for
them, ready to bring the writer and his wife to Entebbe. Hemingway wasn’t happy about flying again. He thought it was better to go by car, but
Cartwright convinced him that it was totally secure. All three of them – Ernest, Mary and Roy
Marsh, the pilot of the crashed plane, squeezed into the “Rapide”. Hemingway wrote later for his article in “Look”
Magazine, that for a third of their takeoff he was thinking they’d never get off the
ground. Yet they kept making attempts at the maximum
speed, jumping from one hill to another like a mountain goat. All of a sudden, they found themselves in
the air, but only for a few seconds. After that, the plane fell to the ground again
with the sound of tearing metal – something they’d gotten used to hearing in the last
couple of days. The fuel tank was torn off the right wing
and it set on fire. The pilot, Mary and Roy Marsh were the first
to get out of the plane. Hemingway was left behind and had to push
the door with his head, since his hands and arms were already injured. When Hemingway was finally out, his hair was
on fire. After a night in a hotel in Uganda, Hemingway
had to fly again to Nairobi – fortunately without any mishaps. It was there, in the New Stanley Hotel, that
the writer dictated a 15,000 word account for “Look” of what had happened to him. He also had a rare chance to read his own
obituary in the newspapers, sent to him from around the world. The world media soon spread the happy news
that Hemingway had survived 2 crashes – one right after the other. It cost him a lot though. In a letter to his friend he wrote that his
kidneys, liver and spleen were injured. He had a concussion, burns on his head and
face, and a dislocated hand and foot. He also partially lost his sight and hearing. On February 15, two weeks after the second
crash, Newsweek reported that the indestructible “Papa”, as Hemingway was nicknamed, hadn’t
obeyed his doctors’ orders to take a complete rest and climbed Mount Kilimanjaro. This, of course, was a bit too extravagant
even for Hemingway. The true story was less impressive but heartrending. After his short recovery, he went to the beach
camp on the Kenyan coast where he’d been scheduled to do some fishing with his son
Patrick. He was in too much pain to go out on the water
more than a couple of times. But when a big brushfire started near the
camp, he couldn’t stay put and went to help the firefighters. They pleaded with him not to, but he insisted
and, since he was still weak and dizzy, he lost his balance and fell right into the flames. He got light burns on his face, chest, stomach
and legs, and very bad ones on his left hand and right arm. The experience he had during their Christmas
trip to Africa inspired Hemingway to write 2 more books – “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”
and “The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber”. In 1999, on Hemingway’s 100th birthdayc,
a popular British actor, Michael Palin, tried to repeat the routes of the writer’s journeys,
after which he published a book: “Hemingway Adventure”. Palin didn’t have to go through the illnesses,
air crashes and other mishaps that Hemingway went through. But he admited that it was an exhausting and
sometimes dangerous trip, that would be too stiff to handle for most people. For Westerners, the wild parts of Africa are
a true test of courage and endurance. Would you go in Hemingway’s footsteps like
Palin did? Let me know down in the comments! If you learned something new today, then give
this video a like and share it with a friend. But – hey! – don’t go to Africa just
yet! We have over 2,000 cool videos for you to
check out. All you have to do is pick the left or right
video, click on it, and enjoy! Stay on the Bright Side of life!

100 thoughts on “Ernest Hemingway Survived Two Planes Crashes In Africa

  1. o the beautiful person scrolling through the messages, i wish you a great day and a blessing year.
    Bride side lover. It's just the best.
    Small channel love and support❀

    I'm uploading a new video in 1 hour too😊😊

  2. He isn’t really lucky. There is like a 90% chance that you would live in a plane crash so he would be among the majority

  3. I personally wouldn't be in Hemingway's footsteps only because it would be traumatic for me. Also I sometimes suffer from anxiety and sometimes PTSD so I wouldn't know how to survive that.

  4. Oh my god poor guy been in a plane crash in one day πŸ˜‚
    Is someone trying to killed hemingway? Hmm i wonder who, is it his friend and the pilot?!
    Who knows, they're the first one to jumped ship leaving him behindπŸ€”
    πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

  5. Hahaha… I am watching from Africa. Not really dangerous here as Americans and Europeans make it seem. Lol

  6. You know, its not a "wild continent". Its just home to some of the most ferocious wild animals "which are in game reserves".
    Its a continent with civilized countries… some more modern than others.

  7. πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ™„πŸ˜˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜

  8. I love bright side you talked about Tanzania in couple of videos first in volcano issue, Second in What $1 will give you in other country And Last this video 😊πŸ₯°

  9. We don’t need to go there because we live there now things are different Modern technology Big cities and etc

  10. Holy cow, that happened in my birthday
    ( im a 2000's id but it is the same day )

  11. Winter tacke nothing sounds like Denny Hamlin during the 2013 sprint cup chaeonship he won but back then it was who had the most points and the puson was jimmy jonson

  12. My dad Roldan S. Castillo survive 5 car accidents the first one happened on May 14,2017 second one July 14,2017 third one January 7,2018 fourth one March 19,2018 the last one August 28,2018

  13. I am already in Africa since I was born πŸ˜‚
    But hey

    Africa makes a football tournament right now
    But hurry it is going to end after a month it started at July 2019 if its later it ended

    In which country πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚
    EGYPTπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ MY HOME COUNTRY

  14. Level 1: πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯ΆπŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°

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    Level 3:πŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™‚οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈπŸ§β€β™€οΈ

    Level 4:πŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ½β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸ§™πŸ»β€β™€οΈ

    Level 5:πŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™‰πŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆ

    Level 6:πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸ¦šπŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„

    Level 7:πŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ‰πŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œπŸ₯œ

    Level 8:πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜„πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜

    Level 9:πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ˜•

    Level 10:πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ¦’πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†πŸ†

    Bonus:πŸ¦…πŸ¦…πŸ¦…πŸ¦…πŸ¦…πŸ¦…πŸ¦…πŸ¦…πŸ¦…πŸ¦‡πŸ¦…πŸ¦…πŸ¦…πŸ¦…πŸ¦…πŸ¦…πŸ¦…πŸ¦…

    Thanks 4 reading 😊

  15. He's crazy, after a plane crash, I wouldnt even think about going aboard any plane, also during recovery I would rest a lot, not like him doing stuff!

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